Announcements of Public Events for Will Thalheimer

Here is list of my public events for the next few months, including conference events, workshops, webinars, and research surveys.

 

OPEN NOW—Research Survey with the eLearning Guild

I’m partnering with the eLearning Guild to conduct a survey on learning-evaluation practices. I would greatly appreciate your time on this—and we estimate it will take you maybe five minutes.

https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/4568935/Learning-Evaluation-Your-Goals-and-Concerns

 

VIDEO JUST RELEASED—Nigel Paine Interviews Will Thalheimer on LearningNowTV

LearningNowTV is a great resource broadcasting from the UK, and they’ve asked me to join them as a regular guest. I’m delighted.

Our first effort came out pretty good. See if you can see the minor hiccups, including me never saying hello, goodbye, or thank you. LOL

Good content though! I talk about LTEM, the Kirkpatrick-Katzell model, and more. Check it out:

https://learningnow.tv/watch/programme-46—30-august-2018/will-thalheimer-on-course-evaluation-kirkpatrick-and-the-ltem-model.html

 

ONLY A FEW DAYS LEFT TO REGISTER—Kansas City, ATD Conference, Thursday Sept 27

I’ll be delivering the closing keynote, but there is so much more to learn at this regional gem of a conference!

Title of my Keynote: Training Quiz Show: Secrets from the Learning Research (and the earth-shaking LTEM too!)

Last day to register is just two days away! Register here: https://tdkc.org/event-3031307

 

ATLANTA ISPI CHAPTER MEETING—Atlanta Georgia, Thursday Night, November 8th

The ISPI Atlanta chapter invited me to join them for two whirlwind sessions, this one on Thursday night and the following day for a morning workshop (see next item).

Title: Dr. Thalheimer’s Learning Medicine Show and Research Palooza

Registration Information Coming Soon!

 

ATLANTA ISPI WORKSHOP ON LTEM—Atlanta Georgia, Friday Morning, November 9th

This will be my first public workshop on LTEM, the Learning-Transfer Evaluation Model. I’ve spoken about LTEM several times over the last year, but this will be the first in-depth workshop. A half day NOT to be missed!

Registration Information Coming Soon!

 

ELEARNING GUILD COMPLIANCE CONFERENCE (ONLINE)—November 14

The eLearning Guild is hosting a fascinating conference on Compliance Training, and I’ll be talking about how to get valid data.

Title: Getting Valid Data on Your Compliance Training (Not as Easy As it Looks)! My session information.

Register Now: https://www.elearningguild.com/content/5358/compliance-training-summit-2018-home

There’s a whole host of great presenters for this two-day summit. Check it out!

 

ISPI BABS CHAPTER (ONLINE WEBINAR)—November 15

ISPI BABS CHAPTER, which includes geographically close-but-not-contiguous Bay Area and Boise State, always hosts interesting programs, including something called the Oyster-Barrel.

I’ll be presenting a webinar on LTEM (The Learning-Transfer Evaluation Model), which unlike oysters, is guaranteed to act like an aphrodisiac for learning professionals.

Title of Webinar: The Learning-Transfer Evaluation Model (LTEM): A Research-Inspired Alternative to the Four Levels.

Here’s a link to register: https://www.ispibabs.org/event-2934366

 

BERLIN GERMANY OEB CONFERENCE WORKSHOP—December 5 Afternoon

Half-day workshop title: Getting Radically Improved Data from Learner Feedback

Sign up for Workshops at: https://oeb.global/programme#workshops. Mine is Workshop A9.

 

BERLIN GERMANY OEB CONFERENCE—December 6 Spotlight Session

A quick 30-minute version of the The Learning Research Quiz Show.

 

 

 

Kansas City, Kansas City Here I Come! ATD KC Chapter’s Annual Conference.

Famous Song Lyrics:

Kansas City, Kansas City Here I Come!
They have a crazy way of learning there, you know you gotta get you some!

I’ll be keynoting a the ATD Kansas City Chapter’s Annual Conference in a few weeks. If you’re in the area, or want to visit please come join me and the local Kansas City area learning professionals.



Click here to sign up for the conference…

 

Thursday, September 27, 2018
  • 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM
  • Johnson County Community College
  • 12345 College Blvd, Overland Park, KS 66210

 

Reflections for Labor Day, Inspired by Long-Time Efforts Channeling Brilliant Researchers

My research-and-consulting practice, Work-Learning Research, was 20 years old last Saturday. This has given me pause to reflect on where I’ve been and how learning research has involved in the past two decades.

Today, as I’m preparing a conference proposal for next year’s ISPI conference, I found an early proposal I put together for the Great Valley chapter of ISPI to speak at one of their monthly meetings back in 2002. I don’t remember whether they actually accepted my proposal, but here is an excerpt:

 

 

Interesting that even way back then, I had found and compiled research on retrieval practice, spacing, feedback, etc. from the scientific journals and the exhaustive labor of hundreds of academic researchers. I am still talking about these foundational learning principles even today—because they are fundamental and because research and practice continue to demonstrate their power. You can look at recent books and websites that are now celebrating these foundational learning factors (Make it Stick, Design for How People Learn, The Ingredients for Great Teaching, Learning Scientists website, etc.).

Feeling blessed today, as we here in the United States move into a weekend where we honor our workers, that I have been able to use my labor to advance these proven principles, uncovered first by brilliant academic researchers such as Bjork, Bahrick, Mayer, Ebbinghaus, Crowder, Sweller, van Merriënboer, Rothkopf, Runquist, Izawa, Smith, Roediger, Melton, Hintzman, Glenberg, Dempster, Estes, Eich, Ericsson, Davies, Garner, Chi, Godden, Baddeley, Hall, Hintzman, Herz, Karpicke, Butler, Kirschner, Clark, Kulhavy, Moreno, Pashler, Cepeda, and many others.

From these early beginnings, I created a listing of twelve foundational learning factors—factors that I have argued should be our first priority in creating great learning—reviewed here in this document.

Happy Labor Day everyone and special thanks to the researchers who continue to make my work possible—and enable learning professionals of all stripes to build increasingly effective learning!

If you’d like to leave a remembrance in regard to Work-Learning Research’s 20th anniversary, or just read my personal reflections about it, you can do that here.

 

Happy Birthday Work-Learning Research!! 20 Years Old

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On August 25th 1998, Work-Learning Research was officially born in Portland, Maine, in the United States of America. Please help me celebrate an eventful 20 years!!

In lieu of a big birthday-party bash, I’d like to offer some thanks, brag a little, and invite you to leave a comment below if my work has touched you in any beneficial ways.

If you want a history of the early years, that’s already written here.

I set out 20 years ago to help bridge the gap between scientific research and practice. I had some naive views about how easy that would be, but I’ve tried over the years to compile research from top-tier scientific journals on learning, memory, and instruction and translate what I find into practical recommendations for learning professionals—particularly for those in the workplace learning field. I haven’t done even one-tenth of what I thought I could do, but I see only a little harm in keeping at it.

Thanks!

I have a ton of people to thank for enabling me to persevere. First, my wife, who has been more than patient. Second, my daughter who, still in her mid-teens, brings me hope for the future. Also, my parents and family who have built a foundation of values and strength. A great deal of credit goes to my clients who, let’s face it, pay the bills and enable this operation to continue. Special thanks for the 227 people who sponsored my Kickstarter campaign to get my smile-sheet book published. Thanks also for the other research-to-practice professionals who are there with ideas, feedback, inspiration, and support. Thanks go out to all those who care about research-based work and evidence-based practice. I thank you for standing up for learning practices that work!

Brags

I’ve made a ton of mistakes as a entrepreneur/consultant, but I’m really proud of a few things, so permit me a moment of hubris to share what they are:

  1. Work-Learning Research has freakin’ survived 20 years!! As the legendary Red Sox radio announcer Joe Castiglione might say, “Can you believe it?”
  2. I have avoided selling out. While vendors regularly approach me asking for research or writing that will publicly praise their offerings, I demur.
  3. I published a book that added a fundamental innovation to the workplace learning field. Performance-Focused Smile Sheets will be, in my not-so-humble opinion, an historic text. I’m also proud that 227 people in our field stood up and contributed $13,614 to help me get the book published!
  4. I was talking about fundamental research-based concepts like retrieval practice and spacing back in the early 2000’s, over ten years before books like Brown, Roediger, and McDaniel (2014) popularized these concepts, and I continue to emphasize fundamental learning factors because they matter the most.
  5. I have developed a new Learning Evaluation model (LTEM) that enables us to abandon the problematic Kirkpatrick-Katzell Four-Level Model of Evaluation.
  6. I have developed a number of extremely useful models and frameworks, including the Learning Maximizers Model, the Learning Landscape Model, the SEDA Model, the Decisive Dozen, etc.
  7. I have pioneered methods to overcome the limitations of multiple-choice tests, specifically enabling multiple-choice tests to overcome its recognition-only problem.
  8. I have created a robust catalog of publications, blog posts, and videos that share research-based practical wisdom.
  9. I have, at least a little bit, encouraged people in our field to be more skeptical and more careful and to be less inclined to buy into some of the biggest myths in the learning field. I’m attempting now to reinvigorate the Debunker.Club to enable those who care about research-based practice to support each other.
  10. I have, in a small way (not as much as I wish I could) attempted to speak truth to power.
  11. I have, I hope at least a little bit, supported other research-to-practice advocates and thought leaders.
  12. I have had the honor of helping many clients and organizations, including notable engagements with The Navy Seals, the Defense Intelligence Agency, Bloomberg, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Walgreens, ADP, Oxfam, Practising Law Institute, U.S. National Park Service, Society of Actuaries, the Kauffman Foundation, ISPI, the eLearning Guild, ATD, and Learning Technologies among many others.
  13. To make it a baker’s dozen, let me say I’m also proud that I’ve still got things I want to do…

Celebrate with Me!

While I would have loved to host a big party and invited you all, in lieu of that dream, I invite you to leave a comment.

Thank you for embracing me and my work for so many years!

Maybe it’s weird that I’m leading the celebration. Maybe it seems sad! Let me just say, f*ck that! The world doesn’t hand out accolades to most of us. We have to do our own work and celebrate where we can! I’m happy it’s Work-Learning Research’s 20 anniversary. I invite you to be happy with me!

I am truly grateful…

One more thing… the official anniversary is in a week, when I’ll be pleasantly lost in a family vacation… Apologies if I can’t respond quickly if you leave a note below!

 

Blogging Since October 2005

This is a personal reminiscence, no valuable content here.

I’ve been blogging since October 10, 2005; when I started using Typepad, an early blogging platform. Today, August 8, 2018, I stopped my Typepad account. Funny, they kept track of every payment I made, my first was on November 25, 2005, the day after the Thanksgiving Holiday here in the United States. I wonder if they had a Black Friday sale. More likely I had extra time to upgrade my blog.

I did a lot of blogging and built a lot of websites over the years. These were my Typepad websites:

  • Work-Learning.com
  • WillAtWorkLearning.com (my blog)
  • SubscriptionLearning.com
  • LearningAudit.com and LearningAudit.net
  • Willsbook.net
  • AudienceResponseLearning.com
  • And two or three others (more personal projects)

I’m not done, but I outgrew the Typepad infrastructure. Now I’m a proud WordPress user. And I still have a few websites:

I want to thank the folks at Typepad for many happy years! I want to thank my readers too!

Later this month I’ll be celebrating Work-Learning Research’s 20th anniversary! I’ll have some more reminiscing to do and more thanks to give!

For today, I’m enjoying turning the page…

Here’s a picture from the Wayback Machine, which captured exactly one day of my blog in 2005, November 5th:

 

One more thing. The very first sentence I ever blogged was this one:

What is the median age when children are potty trained?

You can read that first post here (all my posts have been moved to this website).

And maybe that first sentence was my destiny… I use questions a lot and I’m always trying to get the crap flushed down the toilet!

BIG SMILE

 

 

Guy Wallace Video Series on the History of the Performance-Improvement Movement in Learning and Development

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Guy Wallace has been an exemplar of the highest quality in the performance-improvement field for decades. His 31-page bio is a testament to his incredible work experience. He has worked with other industry luminaries including Dick Hanshaw, Geary Rummler, Dick Clark, Dale Brethower. He not only has been at the center of the move from training to performance—represented in the long arc of ISPI—he’s been capturing that history for years.

I highly recommend his video series.

The only blemish in that series is the video interview he released this week, featuring me. Legacy schmegacy! Seriously though, I am honored. Thank you Guy for all you do and have done!

And Guy’s still going strong in his work, offering optimal methodologies in performance analysis/assessment and curriculum architecture.

Thankful for So Much!! Paying Off My Student Loans at 60 Years of Age

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Today, after turning 60 a few months ago, I finally paid off my student loans—the loans that made it possible for me to get my doctorate from Columbia University. I was in school for eight years from 1988 to 1996, studying with some of the brightest minds in learning, development, and psychology (Rothkopf, Black, Peverly, Kuhn, Higgins, Dweck, Mischel, Darling-Hammond, not to mention my student cohort). If my math is right, that’s 22 years to pay off my student-loan debt. A ton of interest paid too!

I’m eternally grateful! Without the federal government funding my education, my life would have been so much different. I would never have learned how to understand the research on learning. My work at Work-Learning Research, Inc.—attempting to bridge the gap between research and practice—would not have been possible. Thank you to my country—the United States of America—and fellow citizens for giving me the opportunity of a lifetime!! Thanks also must go to my wife for marrying into the forever-string of monthly payments. Without her tolerance and support I certainly would be lost in a different life.

I’ve often reflected on my good fortune in being able to pursue my interests, and wondered why we as a society don’t do more to give our young people an easier road to pursue their dreams. Even when I hear about the brilliant people winning MacArthur fellowships, I wonder why only those who have proven their genius are being boosted. They are deserving of course, but where is our commitment to those who might be teetering on a knife edge of opportunity and economic desperation? I was even lucky as an undergrad back in the late 1970’s, paying relatively little for a good education at a state school and having parents who funded my tuition and living expenses. College today is wicked expensive, cutting out even more of our promising youth from realizing their potential.

Economic mobility is not as easy as we might like it. The World Bank just released a report showing that worldwide only 12% of young adults have been able to obtain more education than their parents. The United States iis no longer the land of opportunity we once liked to imagine.

This is crazy short-sighted, and combine this with our tendency to underfund our public schools, it has the smell of a societal suicide.

That’s depressing! Today I’m celebrating my ability to get student loans two-and-a-half decades ago and pay them off over the last twenty-some years! Hooray!

Seems not so important when put into perspective. It’s something though.

 

 

The Snake Oil Story—Preface to Clark Quinn’s Book on Debunking

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This is my preface to Clark Quinn’s book on debunking the myths in the learning field, Millennials, Goldfish & Other Training Misconceptions: Debunking Learning Myths and Superstitions. (available from Amazon here).

Clark Stanley worked as cowboy and later as a very successful entrepreneur, selling medicine in the United States that he made based on secrets he learned from an Arizona Hopi Indian medicine man. His elixir was made from rattlesnake oil, and was marketed in the 1890’s through public events in which Stanley killed live rattlesnakes and squeezed out their oil in front of admiring crowds. After his medicine gained a wide popularity, Stanley was able to set up production facilities in Massachusetts and Rhode Island with the help of a pharmacist. Stanley made himself a rich man.

You may not know his name, but you’ve certainly heard of his time and place. It was the era of patent medicines—false and sometimes dangerous elixirs sold to men and women of all stripes. Dr. Kilmer’s Swamp Root. Oxien. Kickapoo Indian Sagwa. Dr. Morse’s Indian Root Pills. Enzyte. Bonnore’s Electro Magnetic Bathing Fluid. Radithor. Liquozone. And of course, Clark Stanley’s Snake Oil Liniment.

These medicines were bought by the millions. Fortunes were made. Millions of people were bamboozled, made sick, killed or murdered depending on how you see it. It turns out that, upon being tested, Stanley’s elixir was found to be made mostly from mineral oil, a worthless potion sold by a charlatan. His story of the medicine man and the rattlesnake juice was a more potent concoction than his famous elixir, which when tested was found to have no snake oil anyway.

What causes men and women to miss the truth, to fail to see, to continue happily in harming themselves and those around them? This, unfortunately, is not a question just for the era of patent medicines. It is eternal. It goes back to the dawn of humanity and continues today as well. I have no answer except to assume that our credulity is part of our humanity—and should guide us to be on guard at all times.

What stopped the patent-medicine pandemic of poison, persuasion, and placebo? Did we the people rise up on our own and throw out the scoundrels, the money-grubbers, the snake-oil salesmen? Did we see that we were deceived, or too hopeful, or too blind? Did we as a community heed our senses and find a way to overcome the dangers hidden from us?

No! We did not!

It was not a mass movement back to rationality and truth that saved us. It was the work of a few intrepid agitators who made all the difference. Journalists began reporting on deaths, sicknesses, and addictions resulting from the use of patent medicines. In 1905, Collier’s Weekly published a cover story that exploded the industry. Written by Samuel Hopkins Adams a former crime reporter, with the title, “The Great American Fraud: The Patent Medicine Evil,” the long expose contained sections with headings like, “Medicine or Liquor?”, “The Men Who Back the Fake,” “Absolutely False Claims,” “Drugs that Deprave,” “Prescribing Without Authority,” and “Where the Money Goes.”

The article—or series of articles that today we would call investigative journalism—opened the floodgates and led directly to the Pure Food and Drug Act in 1906, followed later by additional regulations and requirements that continue to this day, with some success, protecting our health and safety.

The ugly truth is that we need help in seeing what we don’t see. This is true too in the learning industry and has been true since at least the early 1900’s when thought leaders in our industry floated bogus claims that people remember 10% of what they read, 20% of what they hear, 30% of what they see, et cetera. Indeed, it was partly the bogus claims floating around the learning industry in the late 1990’s that made me optimistic that starting a research-based consulting practice would find an audience, that perhaps the learning field could be protected from snake oil charlatans.

Bogus claims are not merely inert flotsam to be navigated around. At a minimum, they take attention away from learning practices that are more fundamental and effective, pushing us to waste time and resources. More insidious is that they proactively cause harm, hurting learners and weakening our learning outcomes.

I wish I could report that starting Work-Learning Research twenty years ago has had the influence that Samuel Hopkins Adams had in his journalism. Alas, I am a faint voice in the howling wind of our industry. Fortunately, there are many muckraking research-to-practice practitioners today, including folks like Paul Kirschner, Patti Shank, Guy Wallace, Pedro De Bruyckere, Julie Dirksen, Donald Clark, Ruth Clark, Mirjam Neelen, Jane Bozarth, and more. There are also legions of academic researchers who do the science necessary to enable research-to-practice wisdom to be compiled and conveyed to trainers, instructional designers, elearning developers and learning executives.

I am especially optimistic now that Clark Quinn has compiled, for the first time, the myths, misconceptions, and confusions that imbue the workplace learning field with faulty decision making and ineffective learning practices. As Clark rightly advises, don’t read the book in one sitting. You will find it too much—too many misconceptions and malingering falsehoods, and too much heartache to think that our field could tolerate so much snake oil.

Here’s what we don’t realize. Today’s workplace-learning snake oil is costing us billions of dollars in wasted effort, misspent resources, ill-advised decisions, and distraction from the science-of-learning fundamentals that have proven to be effective! Every time a trainer reads an article on learning styles and adjusts his or her training to make it suitable for visual, auditory, kinesthetic, and olfactory learners; time is wasted, money is spent, and learning is hurt. Every time an instructional designer goes to a conference and hears that neuroscience should guide learning design, he or she takes this faulty meme back to colleagues and infects them with false hope and ineffective learning strategies. Every time a Chief Learning Officer hears that learning events should be shrunk to 4-minute microlearning videos, that storytelling is everything, that all learning is social, that virtual reality is the future of learning—every time our learning executives jump on a bandwagon and send us to training or conferences or hire experts in these multitudinous fascinations—we are diverted from the veritable essence of learning. We waste our own developmental budgets with snake-oil rostrums. We waste time organizing ourselves around wrong-headed initiatives. We ignore what really works, all the while costing our organizations billions of dollars in waste and ineffective learning practices.

Let us start anew today. We can begin with Clark’s book. It is a veritable treasure chest of wisdom. But let’s keep going. Let’s stay skeptical. Let’s look to the scientific research for knowledge. Let’s become more demanding and knowledgeable ourselves, knowing that we all have more to learn. Let’s look to the research translators who know the work that we do as instructional designers, trainers, and developers. Let’s do our own testing. Let’s improve our evaluation systems so that we get better feedback day by day. Let’s pilot, rework, improve, and continue to learn!

As the history of patent medicine shows, we must be forever vigilant against our own blindness and against those who will sell us the miraculous hope of snake-oil cure-alls.

Dealing with Emotional Readiness — What Should We be Doing?

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I included this piece in my newsletter this morning (which you can sign up for here) and it seemed to really resonate with people, so I’m including it here.

I’ve always had a high tolerance for pain, but breaking my collarbone at the end of February really sent me crashing down a mountain. Lying in bed, I got thinking about the emotional side of workplace performance. I don’t have brilliant insights here, just maybe some thoughts that will get you thinking.

Skiing with my family in Vermont, it had been a very good week. My wife and I, skiing together on our next-to-last day on the mountain, went to look for the kids who told us they’d be skiing in the terrain park (where the jumps are). My wife skied down first, then I went. There was a little jump, about a foot high, of the kind I’d jumped many times. But this time would be different.

As I sailed over the jump — slowly because I’m wary of going too fast and flying too far — I looked down and saw, NOT snow, but stairs. WTF? Every other time I took a small jump there was snow on the other side. Not metal stairs. Not dry metal stairs. In mid-air my thought was, “okay, just stay calm, you’ll ski over the stairs back to snow.” Alas, what happened was that I came crashing down on my left shoulder, collarbone splintering into five or six pieces, and lay 20 feet down the hill. I knew right away that things were bad. I knew that my life would be upended for weeks or months. I knew that miserable times lay ahead.

I got up quickly. I was in shock and knew it. I looked up the mountain back at the jump. Freakin’ stairs!! What they hell were they doing there? I was rip-roaring mad! One of my skis was still on the stairs. The dry surface must have grabbed it, preventing me from skiing further down the slope. I retrieved my ski. A few people skied by me. My wife was long gone down the mountain. I was in shock and I was mad as hell and I couldn’t think straight, but I knew I shouldn’t sit down so I just stood there for five or ten minutes in a daze. Finally someone asked if I was okay, and I yelled crazy loud for the whole damn mountain to hear, “NO!” He was nice, said he’d contact the ski patrol.

I’ll spare you the details of the long road to recovery — a recovery not yet complete — but the notable events are that I had badly broken my collarbone, badly sprained my right thumb and mildly sprained my left thumb, couldn’t button my shirts or pants for a while, had to lie in bed in one position or the pain would be too great, watched a ton of Netflix (I highly recommend Seven Seconds!), couldn’t do my work, couldn’t help around the house, got surgery on my collarbone, got pneumonia, went to physical therapy, etc… Enough!

Feeling completely useless, I couldn’t help reflect on the emotional side of learning, development, and workplace performance in general. In L&D, we tend to be helping people who are able to learn and take actions — but maybe not all the people we touch are emotionally present and able. Some are certainly dealing with family crises, personal insecurities, previous job setbacks, and the like. Are we doing enough for them?

I’m not a person prone to depression, but I was clearly down for the count. My ability to do meaningful work was nil. At first it was the pain and the opiates. Later it was the knowledge that I just couldn’t get much work done, that I was unable to keep up with promises I’d made, that I was falling behind. I knew, intellectually, that I just had to wait it out — and this was a great comfort. But still, my inability to think and to work reminded me that as a learning professional I ought to be more empathetic with learners who may be suffering as well.

Usually, dealing with emotional issues of an employee falls to the employee and his or her manager. I used to be a leadership trainer and I don’t remember preparing my learners for how to deal with direct reports who might be emotionally unready to fully engage with work. Fortunately today we are willing to talk about individual differences, but I think we might be forgetting the roller-coaster ride of being human, that we may differ in our emotional readiness on any given day. Managers/supervisors rightly are the best resource for dealing with such issues, but we in L&D might have a role to play as well.

I don’t have answers here. I wish I did. Probably it begins with empathy. We also can help more when we know our learners more — and when we can look them in the eyes. This is tricky business though. We’re not qualified to be therapists and simple solutions like being nice and kind and keeping things positive is not always the answer. We know from the research that challenging people with realistic decision-making challenges is very beneficial. Giving honest feedback on poor performance is beneficial.

We should probably avoid scolding and punishment and reprimands. Competition has been shown to harmful in at least some learning situations. Leaderboards may make emotional issues worse, and generally the limited research suggests they aren’t very useful anyway. But these negative actions are rarely invoked, so we have to look deeper.

I wish I had more wisdom about this. I wish there was research-based evidence I could draw on. I wish I could say more than just be human, empathetic, understanding.

Now that I’m aware of this, I’m going to keep my eyes and ears open to learning more about how we as learning professionals can design learning interventions to be more sensitive to the ups and downs of our fellow travelers.

If you’ve got good ideas, please send them my way or use the LinkedIn Post generated from this to join the discussion.

Will Thalheimer Interviewed by Jeffrey Dalto

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Series of Four Interviews

I was recently interviewed by Jeffrey Dalto of Convergence Training. Jeffrey is a big fan of research-based practice. He did a great job compiling the interviews.

Click on the title of each one to read the interview: