Below is another example of the misuse of the now-infamous bogus percentages by a speaker at a prominent international conference in the workplace learning field, this time in an online session in January 2009.

I have documented this problem starting in 2002. The following posts illustrate this problem.

A manager at Qube Learning joins the list of folks who have been fooled, and who foolishly and irresponsibly re-gift this faulty information. Point: If you can't verify the credibility of the so-called "research" you come across, don't share it.

Cone_January2009

And this follow-up slide:

Cone_January2009b

It's a shame we have to keep revisiting this bogus information. I truly wish I didn't have to do this.

Of course, even if you and I wipe this bogus-information example off the face of the earth, there will be more misinformation we'll have to deal with. It's okay. It's the nature of living I think. The learning point here is that all of us in the learning-and-performance field must be vigilant. We must be skeptical of claims. We must build structures where we can test these bogus claims in the crucible of an evidence-based marketplace. It is only then that we will be able to build a fully-worthy profession.

Keep sending me your examples. Thanks to the helpful soul who sent me this example.

Interestingly, just today a major player in our field asked me permission to publish the original blog post (the one debunking the bogus-percentage myth) in their company newsletter (which goes out to over 100,000 people). They too had been using this misinformation in their work and now wanted to correct their mistake. I salute their action.